Cherry Jam in the Telegraphic Style

In the tradition of my ancestors, I made some jam out of cherries recently at home. As I mentioned in a prior post, cherries have a long, beautiful, and tasty Jewish history stretching back over a thousand years. Jam, though more recent, has also become an institution in the past 150 years.

I decided, however, to try something different, and play around with the recipe format. I have been interested recently in what Eve Jochnowitz once called the “telegraphic style” of pre-war recipes, which do not start with an ingredients list. Though in many ways this style of recipe writing is inaccessible for some, it may also be more accessible for others who think chronologically. I find that it also works for quantity-flexible recipes like jam. Let me know what you think.

Cherry Jam

Take some black cherries, and remove the stems and pits.

Then, weigh the cherries, and pour them into a big pot.

Add the equivalent weight in white sugar.

Then, for every 500g/1 pound of cherries, add:

-one teaspoon red wine

-two tablespoons of water

-a dash of cinnamon

Then, add some vanilla extract. The cherry skin should have adequate pectin, but if you want to, you can also add some pectin.

Turn on the stove and bring to a boil.

Stir regularly and reduce to a simmer. Foam will start to bubble up – remove it with your spoon.

Cook for 30-50 minutes, or until the water has reduced, and the syrup part gels on a spoon when removed from the heat. Test by sticking a spoon in.

Put into containers before cooling. If you choose to can, follow safe canning guidelines. If not, the jam keeps for up to a year in the freezer, 3-6 months in the refrigerator.

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