Laziness is Welcome in the Jewish Kitchen

A bit of a short post this time: a number of readers have asked me for some easy Jewish recipes – things that do not require a lot of effort or metaphorical spoons. I am more than happy to fulfill this request. So I have included three recipes:

  1. Apple lokshen – a simple noodle recipe with apples and mustard. This is a slightly unorthodox take on classic Ashkenazi egg noodles, with a traditional savory use of apple and a slightly wacky use of mustard. The mustard actually works – trust me on this.
  2. A simple salad, without raw tomato, that goes with many different dishes.
  3. Poached eggs – something that is easier than it seems to make, and very traditional in many Jewish traditions.

Enjoy!

Lazy Apple Lokshen

1 package egg noodles

2 apples, cored and chopped

8-12 cloves white garlic, crushed

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon mustard

1/2 cup water

 

2 tablespoons oil (mild-flavored preferred)

Apple lokshen on a plate

  1. Cook the noodles according to package directions.
  2. Heat a skillet on a high flame, then add oil.
  3. Add the apples and garlic. Sauté for 4-5 minutes, or until the apples are more tender.
  4. Add the salt, mustard, and water to the apples. Mix in thoroughly. Cook for another 5-10 minutes, or until the apples are soft and the water has reduced.
  5. Turn off the heat. Pour the apple mixture over the noodles and mix thoroughly. Serve hot.

Lazy Salad

2 medium cucumbers, chopped

2 bell peppers, cored and diced

4 scallions, chopped

1 tablespoon maple syrup

1 tablespoon red wine vinegar

1 tablespoon soy sauce

2 tablespoons olive oil

  1. Mix the dry ingredients together in a bowl.
  2. Mix the wet ingredients together in a glass, and stir together.
  3. Pour the dressing over the vegetables. Mix.

The salad, in a bowl

How to Poach an Egg

You will need:

-an egg

-about 2 cups of water

-2 tablespoons vinegar

 

You will also need

-a small cup

-a small saucepan or skillet

-a normal spoon

-a slotted spoon

 

Crack the egg into the cup.

Bring the water to a boil in the skillet.

When the water is boiling, reduce the heat and add the vinegar. Wait until the water is simmering – bubbling a bit but not rapidly.

Pour the egg from the cup into the water. Do this with the cup close to the water – it helps the egg keep its shape.

The egg will be in the water and the white will be pushing around the yolk. Use the spoon to push the white towards the yolk a little.

Let the egg cook for 3-4 minutes. You will be able to see the white “firm up” when it is cooked. The egg will also be closer to the surface.

Remove the egg with a slotted spoon. You can also pat it dry with a paper towel. Poached eggs keep for up to two days in the fridge. I put them on everything.

Nota bene: if you are poaching several at a time, try not to have more than three or four in the pot at once. The starch in the egg bubbles up a lot sometimes. I usually poach two for myself, three if I am hungry.

Poached eggs in a squash soup!
Poached eggs in a squash soup! (Photo mine, September 2016)

I originally published the directions for poaching an egg on my Facebook in July 2017.

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